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Rebuilding cancer metastasis in the mouse

Saxena, M. and Christofori, G.. (2013) Rebuilding cancer metastasis in the mouse. Molecular oncology, Vol. 7, H. 2. pp. 283-296.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6338671

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Abstract

Most cancer deaths are due to the systemic dissemination of cancer cells and the formation of secondary tumors (metastasis) in distant organs. Recent years have brought impressive progress in metastasis research, yet we still lack sufficient insights into how cancer cells migrate out of primary tumors and invade into neighboring tissue, intravasate into the blood or the lymphatic circulation, survive in the blood stream, and target specific organs to initiate metastatic outgrowth. While a large number of cellular and animal models of cancer have been crucial in delineating the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and progression, experimental models that faithfully recapitulate the multiple stages of metastatic disease are still scarce. The advent of sophisticated genetic engineering in mice, in particular the ability to manipulate gene expression in specific tissue and at desired time points at will, have allowed to rebuild the metastatic process in mice. Here, we describe a selection of cellular experimental systems, tumor transplantation mouse models and genetically engineered mouse models that are used for monitoring specific processes involved in metastasis, such as cell migration and invasion, and for investigating the full metastatic process. Such models not only aid in deciphering the pathomechanisms of metastasis, but are also instrumental for the preclinical testing of anti-metastatic therapies and further refinement and generation of improved models.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Biomedizin > Division of Biochemistry and Genetics > Tumor Biology (Christofori)
UniBasel Contributors:Christofori, Gerhard M.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1574-7891
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:10 Apr 2015 09:13
Deposited On:10 Apr 2015 09:13

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