edoc

Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites

Najer, Adrian and Wu, Dalin and Bieri, Andrej and Brand, Françoise and Palivan, Cornelia G. and Beck, Hans-Peter and Meier, Wolfgang. (2014) Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites. ACS Nano, 8 (12). pp. 12560-12571.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6329085

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics—polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells—were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Chemie > Chemie > Makromolekulare Chemie (Meier)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Former Units within Swiss TPH > Molecular Parasitology and Epidemiology (Beck)
UniBasel Contributors:Palivan, Cornelia G and Beck, Hans-Peter
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:1936-0851
e-ISSN:1936-086X
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Identification Number:
Last Modified:10 Apr 2017 07:12
Deposited On:09 Jan 2015 09:25

Repository Staff Only: item control page