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Prevalence of acute mountain sickness at 3500 m within and between families : a prospective cohort study

Kriemler, Susi and Bürgi, Flavia and Wick, Christian and Wick, Birgit and Keller, Melanie and Wiget, Urs and Schindler, Christian and Kaufmann, Beat A. and Kohler, Malcolm and Bloch, Konrad and Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter. (2014) Prevalence of acute mountain sickness at 3500 m within and between families : a prospective cohort study. High altitude medicine & biology, Vol. 15, no. 1. pp. 28-38.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6254463

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Abstract

Abstract Kriemler, Susi, Flavia Bürgi, Christian Wick, Birgit Wick, Melanie Keller, Urs Wiget, Christian Schindler, Beat A. Kaufmann, Malcolm Kohler, Konrad Bloch, and Hans-Peter Brunner-La Rocca. Prevalence of acute mountain sickness at 3500 m within and between families: A prospective cohort study. High Alt Biol Med. 15:28-38, 2014.-Aim: To investigate symptoms, prevalence and associated factors of acute mountain sickness (AMS) in families upon a fast ascent to 3450 m. Methods: 87 children, 70 adolescents, and 155 parents (n=312) were assessed for AMS 8-10 and 20-24 hours after fast passive ascent by the Lake Louise Score (LLS). Pain sensitivity and oxygen saturation (SO2) were measured and familial clustering was assessed. Results: AMS prevalence was significantly lower in children (21%) compared to adolescents (34%) and adults (39%) on day 1 (p>0.05), but not on day 2 (18% vs. 19% and 25%). Cumulative prevalence of AMS was 30, 37, and 45% in children, adolescents, and adults, respectively (p>0.001). Familial clustering of AMS was consistent and explained 25%-50% of variability in AMS. Pain sensitivity significantly increased from low to high altitude and was higher at low altitude in those with compared to those without AMS. SO2 at high altitude was not related to the presence of AMS. Conclusions: After fast ascent to 3500 m, AMS prevalence was lower in children than in adolescents and adults on day 1, but not on day 2. Thus, children may travel at least as safely to an altitude of 3500 m as adolescents and adults, even if risk factors (pain sensitivity and heredity) are present.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Biostatistics > Biostatistics - Frequency Modelling (Schindler)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Former Units within Swiss TPH > Physical Activity and Health (Kriemler)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
UniBasel Contributors:Kriemler, Susi and Schindler, Christian
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1527-0297
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:15 Aug 2014 07:16
Deposited On:15 Aug 2014 07:16

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