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Chimney stoves modestly improved indoor air quality measurements compared with traditional open fire stoves : results from a small-scale intervention study in rural Peru

Hartinger, S. M. and Commodore, A. A. and Hattendorf, J. and Lanata, C. F. and Gil, A. I. and Verastegui, H. and Aguilar-Villalobos, M. and Mäusezahl, D. and Naeher, L. P.. (2013) Chimney stoves modestly improved indoor air quality measurements compared with traditional open fire stoves : results from a small-scale intervention study in rural Peru. Indoor air : international journal of indoor environment and health, Vol. 23, H. 4. pp. 342-352.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6164966

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Abstract

Nearly half of the world's population depends on biomass fuels to meet domestic energy needs, producing high levels of pollutants responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. We compare carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM2.5 ) exposures and kitchen concentrations in households with study-promoted intervention (OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves) in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. We determined 48-h indoor air concentration levels of CO and PM2.5 in 93 kitchen environments and personal exposure, after OPTIMA-improved stoves had been installed for an average of 7 months. PM2.5 and CO measurements did not differ significantly between OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves. Although not statistically significant, a post hoc stratification of OPTIMA-improved stoves by level of performance revealed mean PM2.5 and CO levels of fully functional OPTIMA-improved stoves were 28% lower (n = 20, PM2.5, 136 μg/m(3) 95% CI 54-217) and 45% lower (n = 25, CO, 3.2 ppm, 95% CI 1.5-4.9) in the kitchen environment compared with the control stoves (n = 34, PM2.5 , 189 μg/m(3) , 95% CI 116-261; n = 44, CO, 5.8 ppm, 95% CI 3.3-8.2). Likewise, although not statistically significant, personal exposures for OPTIMA-improved stoves were 43% and 17% lower for PM2.5 (n = 23) and CO (n = 25), respectively. Stove maintenance and functionality level are factors worthy of consideration for future evaluations of stove interventions.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Household Economics and Health Systems Research > Household Health Systems (Mäusezahl)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
UniBasel Contributors:Mäusezahl, Daniel and Hattendorf, Jan
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Blackwell
ISSN:0905-6947
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:27 Mar 2014 13:13
Deposited On:27 Mar 2014 13:13

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