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A high force of Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection drives the rapid acquisition of immunity in Papua New Guinean children

Koepfli, Cristian and Colborn, Kathryn L. and Kiniboro, Benson and Lin, Enmoore and Speed, Terence P. and Siba, Peter M. and Felger, Ingrid and Mueller, Ivo. (2013) A high force of Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection drives the rapid acquisition of immunity in Papua New Guinean children. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, Vol. 7, H. 9 , e2403.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6174425

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Abstract

When both parasite species are co-endemic, Plasmodium vivax incidence peaks in younger children compared to P. falciparum. To identify differences in the number of blood stage infections of these species and its potential link to acquisition of immunity, we have estimated the molecular force of blood-stage infection of P. vivax (molFOB, i.e. the number of genetically distinct blood-stage infections over time), and compared it to previously reported values for P. falciparum.; P. vivax molFOB was estimated by high resolution genotyping parasites in samples collected over 16 months in a cohort of 264 Papua New Guinean children living in an area highly endemic for P. falciparum and P. vivax. In this cohort, P. vivax episodes decreased three-fold over the age range of 1-4.5 years.; On average, children acquired 14.0 new P. vivax blood-stage clones/child/year-at-risk. While the incidence of clinical P. vivax illness was strongly associated with mol FOB (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.99, 95% confidence interval (CI95) [1.80, 2.19]), molFOB did not change with age. The incidence of P. vivax showed a faster decrease with age in children with high (IRR = 0.49, CI95 [0.38, 0.64] p>0.001) compared to those with low exposure (IRR = 0.63, CI95[0.43, 0.93] p = 0.02).; P. vivax molFOB is considerably higher than P. falciparum molFOB (5.5 clones/child/year-at-risk). The high number of P. vivax clones that infect children in early childhood contribute to the rapid acquisition of immunity against clinical P. vivax malaria.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology > Molecular Diagnostics (Felger)
UniBasel Contributors:Köpfli, Christian and Felger, Ingrid
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1935-2727
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
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Last Modified:31 Dec 2015 10:54
Deposited On:31 Jan 2014 09:49

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