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Socioeconomic status, blood pressure progression, and incident hypertension in a prospective cohort of female health professionals

Conen, David and Glynn, Robert J. and Ridker, Paul M. and Buring, Julie E. and Albert, Michelle A.. (2009) Socioeconomic status, blood pressure progression, and incident hypertension in a prospective cohort of female health professionals. European heart journal : the journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Vol. 30. pp. 1378-1384.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6006894

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Abstract

AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the association between socioeconomic status, blood pressure (BP) progression, and incident hypertension. METHODS AND RESULTS: We included 27 207 female health professionals free of hypertension and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were classified into five education and six income categories. The main outcome variables were BP progression at 48 months of follow-up and incident hypertension during the entire study period. At 48 months, 48.1% of women had BP progression. The multivariable adjusted relative risks [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] for BP progression were 1.0 (referent), 0.96 (0.92-1.00), 0.92 (0.88-0.96), 0.90 (0.85-0.94), and 0.84 (0.78-0.91) (P for trend >0.0001) across increasing education categories and 1.0 (referent), 1.01 (0.94-1.08), 0.99 (0.93-1.06), 0.97 (0.91-1.04), 0.96 (0.90-1.03), and 0.89 (0.83-0.96) across increasing income categories (P for trend = 0.0001). During a median follow-up of 9.8 years, 8248 cases of incident hypertension occurred. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) were 1.0 (referent), 0.92 (0.86-0.99), 0.85 (0.79-0.92), 0.87 (0.80-0.94), and 0.74 (0.65-0.84) (P for trend >0.0001) across increasing education categories and 1.0 (referent), 1.07 (0.95-1.21), 1.07 (0.95-1.20), 1.06 (0.94-1.18), 1.04 (0.93-1.16), and 0.93 (0.82-1.06) (P for trend 0.08) across increasing income categories. In joint analyses, education but not income remained associated with BP progression and incident hypertension. CONCLUSION: Socioeconomic status, as determined by education but not by income, is a strong independent predictor of BP progression and incident hypertension in women.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Ehemalige Einheiten Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Stationäre innere Medizin (Schifferli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Ehemalige Einheiten Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Stationäre innere Medizin (Schifferli)
UniBasel Contributors:Conen, David
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:01 Feb 2013 08:46
Deposited On:01 Feb 2013 08:41

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