edoc

Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection and colonisation of insertion site and catheter tip : What are the rates and risk factors in haematology patients?

Luft, Dirk and Schmoor, Claudia and Wilson, Christine and Widmer, Andreas F. and Bertz, Hartmut and Frei, Reno and Heim, Dominik and Dettenkofer, Markus. (2010) Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection and colonisation of insertion site and catheter tip : What are the rates and risk factors in haematology patients? Annals of hematology, Vol. 89, issue 12. pp. 1265-1275.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6003618

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

Skin colonisation is an important source for central venous catheter (CVC) colonisation and infection. This study intended to identify risk factors for skin colonisation prior to CVC placement (baseline colonisation) and within 10 days after CVC insertion (subsequent colonisation), for CVC-tip colonisation and for bloodstream infection (BSI). Within a randomised clinical trial, data of 219 patients with haematological malignancies and inserted CVC (with a total of 5,501 CVC-days and 4,275 days at risk) in two university hospitals were analysed. Quantitative skin cultures were obtained from the insertion site before CVC placement and at regular intervals afterwards. CVC-tip cultures were taken on CVC removal and data collection was performed. Statistical analysis included linear and logistic regression models. Age was an independent risk factor for colonisation prior to CVC placement (baseline colonisation). Independent risk factors for subsequent colonisation were baseline colonisation and male gender. High level of subsequent skin colonisation at the insertion site was a predictor of CVC-tip colonisation, and a predictor of BSI. High level of skin colonisation predicts catheter tip colonisation and possibly subsequent infection. Sustained reduction of bacterial growth at the CVC insertion site is therefore indispensable. Male patients are at particular risk for skin colonisation and may be a target population for additional insertion-site care before and during catheterisation.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Querschnittsfächer (Klinik) > Labormedizin > Klinische Mikrobiologie (Frei)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Querschnittsfächer (Klinik) > Labormedizin > Klinische Mikrobiologie (Frei)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Infektiologie > Infektiologie (Battegay M)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Klinische Forschung > Bereich Medizinische Fächer (Klinik) > Infektiologie > Infektiologie (Battegay M)
UniBasel Contributors:Widmer, Andreas F.-X. and Frei, Reno
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0939-5555
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
Last Modified:07 Dec 2012 13:04
Deposited On:07 Dec 2012 13:03

Repository Staff Only: item control page