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Autoantibodies against complement C1q correlate with the thyroid function in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

Potlukova, E. and Jiskra, J. and Limanova, Z. and Kralikova, P. and Smutek, D. and Mareckova, H. and Antosova, M. and Trendelenburg, M.. (2008) Autoantibodies against complement C1q correlate with the thyroid function in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Clinical and experimental immunology, Vol. 153, no. 1. pp. 96-101.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6003520

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Abstract

Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q) have been well described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, where they correlate with the occurrence of severe lupus nephritis. However, data on anti-C1q in organ-specific autoimmune diseases are scarce. In order to determine the prevalence of anti-C1q in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITD) and a possible association with thyroid function, we measured prospectively anti-C1q in 23 patients with Graves' disease (GD) and 52 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Anti-C1q levels were correlated with parameters of thyroid function and autoantibodies against thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor. Twenty-one patients with multi-nodular goitre and 72 normal blood donors served as controls. We found elevated concentrations of anti-C1q more frequently in patients with AITD than in controls: seven of 23 (30%) patients with GD and 11 of 52 (21%) patients with HT, compared with one of 21 (5%) patients with multi-nodular goitre and six of 72 (8%) normal controls. Anti-C1q levels did not correlate with thyroid autoantibodies. However, in GD absolute levels of anti-C1q correlated negatively with TSH and positively with free thyroxine (FT4) and triiodothyronine (FT3). In contrast, in HT, anti-C1q correlated positively with TSH levels. No correlation between TSH and thyroid autoantibodies was found. In conclusion, we found an increased prevalence of anti-C1q in patients with AITD and their levels correlated with the thyroid function in both GD and HT. This correlation seems to be independent of thyroid autoantibodies. Therefore, anti-C1q might point to a pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of AITD that is independent of classical thyroid autoantibodies.
Faculties and Departments:03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Biomedizin > Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel > Clinical Immunology (Trendelenburg)
UniBasel Contributors:Trendelenburg, Marten
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Blackwell
ISSN:0009-9104
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:08 Nov 2012 16:23
Deposited On:08 Nov 2012 16:20

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