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Vertical versus dynamic menus on the World Wide Web : eye tracking study measuring the influence of menu design and task complexity on user performance and subjective preference

Leuthold, S. and Schmutz, P. and Bargas-Avila, J. A. and Tuch, A. N. and Opwis, K.. (2011) Vertical versus dynamic menus on the World Wide Web : eye tracking study measuring the influence of menu design and task complexity on user performance and subjective preference. Computers in human behavior, Vol. 27, H. 1. pp. 465-474.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5839850

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Abstract

Web sites need fast and effective navigation systems. An eye tracking laboratory study with n=120 participants was conducted to compare the influence of different navigation designs (vertical versus dynamic menus) and task complexity (simple versus complex navigation tasks) on user performance, navigation strategy, and subjective preference. With vertical menus, users needed less eye fixations, were faster and more successful. We conclude that, firstly, vertical menus fit better to perception and cognition than dynamic menus, where the navigation items are hidden and must be accessed by an additional mouse click. Secondly, navigation systems should be extended with different kinds of navigation items adapted to the complexity of the users' navigation tasks, because users tend to switch their navigation strategy when confronted with complex tasks. Web sites need fast and effective navigation systems. An eye tracking laboratory study with n=120 participants was conducted to compare the influence of different navigation designs (vertical versus dynamic menus) and task complexity (simple versus complex navigation tasks) on user performance, navigation strategy, and subjective preference. With vertical menus, users needed lesseye fixations, were faster and more successful. We conclude that, firstly, vertical menus fit better to perception and cognition than dynamic menus, where the navigation items are hidden and must be accessed by an additional mouse click. Secondly, navigation systems should be extended with different kinds of navigation items adapted to the complexity of the users' navigation tasks, because users tend to switch their navigation strategy when confronted with complex tasks.
Faculties and Departments:07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Forschungsbereich Persönlichkeits- und Entwicklungspsychologie > Allgemeine Psychologie und Methodologie (Opwis)
07 Faculty of Psychology > Departement Psychologie > Ehemalige Einheiten Psychologie > Mensch-Maschine Interaktion (Bargas-Avila)
UniBasel Contributors:Bargas-Avila, Javier Andrés and Leuthold, Stefan and Schmutz, Peter and Tuch, Alexandre N and Opwis, Klaus
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0747-5632
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Last Modified:14 Sep 2012 07:20
Deposited On:14 Sep 2012 07:03

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