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Cyclin-dependent protein kinases : key regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle

Nigg, E. A.. (1995) Cyclin-dependent protein kinases : key regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Bioessays, Vol. 17, H. 6. pp. 471-480.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5249457

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Abstract

Passage through the cell cycle requires the successive activation of different cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs). These enzymes are controlled by transient associations with cyclin regulatory subunits, binding of inhibitory polypeptides and reversible phosphorylation reactions. To promote progression towards DNA replication, CDK/cyclin complexes phosphorylate proteins required for the activation of genes involved in DNA synthesis, as well as components of the DNA replication machinery. Subsequently, a different set of CDK/cyclin complexes triggers the phosphorylation of numerous proteins to promote the profound structural reorganizations that accompany the entry of cells into mitosis. At present, much research is focused on elucidating the links between CDK/cyclin complexes and signal transduction pathways controlling cell growth, differentiation and death. In future, a better understanding of the cell cycle machinery and its deregulation during oncogenesis may provide novel opportunities for the diagnostic and therapeutic management of cancer and other proliferation-related diseases.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Biozentrum
05 Faculty of Science > Departement Biozentrum > Former Organization Units Biozentrum > Cell Biology (Nigg)
UniBasel Contributors:Nigg, Erich A.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:The Company of Biologists
ISSN:0265-9247
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:22 Mar 2012 14:19
Deposited On:22 Mar 2012 13:17

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