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Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals widespread full phosphorylation site occupancy during mitosis

Olsen, J. V. and Vermeulen, M. and Santamaria, A. and Kumar, C. and Miller, M. L. and Jensen, L. J. and Gnad, F. and Cox, J. and Jensen, T. S. and Nigg, E. A. and Brunak, S. and Mann, M.. (2010) Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals widespread full phosphorylation site occupancy during mitosis. Science Signaling, Vol. 3, H. 104 , ra3.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5842439

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Abstract

Eukaryotic cells replicate by a complex series of evolutionarily conserved events that are tightly regulated at defined stages of the cell division cycle. Progression through this cycle involves a large number of dedicated protein complexes and signaling pathways, and deregulation of this process is implicated in tumorigenesis. We applied high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics to investigate the proteome and phosphoproteome of the human cell cycle on a global scale and quantified 6027 proteins and 20,443 unique phosphorylation sites and their dynamics. Co-regulated proteins and phosphorylation sites were grouped according to their cell cycle kinetics and compared to publicly available messenger RNA microarray data. Most detected phosphorylation sites and more than 20% of all quantified proteins showed substantial regulation, mainly in mitotic cells. Kinase-motif analysis revealed global activation during S phase of the DNA damage response network, which was mediated by phosphorylation by ATM or ATR or DNA-dependent protein kinases. We determined site-specific stoichiometry of more than 5000 sites and found that most of the up-regulated sites phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) or CDK2 were almost fully phosphorylated in mitotic cells. In particular, nuclear proteins and proteins involved in regulating metabolic processes have high phosphorylation site occupancy in mitosis. This suggests that these proteins may be inactivated by phosphorylation in mitotic cells.
Faculties and Departments:05 Faculty of Science > Departement Biozentrum > Former Organization Units Biozentrum > Cell Biology (Nigg)
UniBasel Contributors:Nigg, Erich A.
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN:1937-9145
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:08 Jun 2012 06:56
Deposited On:08 Jun 2012 06:51

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