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Collateral benefits of restricted insecticide application for control of African trypanosomiasis on Theileria parva in cattle : a randomized controlled trial

Muhanguzi, Dennis and Picozzi, Kim and Hatendorf, Jan and Thrusfield, Michael and Welburn, Susan Christina and Kabasa, John David and Waiswa, Charles. (2014) Collateral benefits of restricted insecticide application for control of African trypanosomiasis on Theileria parva in cattle : a randomized controlled trial. Parasites and Vectors, 7 (432).

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6308518

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Abstract

Tick and tsetse-borne diseases (TTBDs) constrain livestock production in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Of this community of endemic diseases, East coast fever (T.parva) is the most important tick-borne disease (TBD) accounting for 70% of all losses due to TBDS in this region where control efforts target either tsetse or TBDs and seldom both. In those instances where simultaneous pyrethroid insecticide TTBD control is implemented, collateral benefits of tsetse control on TBD control have not been quantified. In the interest of guiding future TTBD control efforts, the effect of restricting pyrethroid insecticides to the legs, belly and ears (RAP) of cattle for tsetse and trypanosomiasis control on T.parva prevalence in crop-livestock production systems in Tororo district, south-eastern Uganda was determined.; We randomly allocated 16 villages to diminazene diaceturate (DA) and 3 graded RAP (25%, 50% and 75% of village herd sprayed respectively) treatment regimens. All cattle were ear-tagged, treated with diminazene diaceturate (DA) and those in regimens 2-4 received monthly graded RAP. Blood samples taken fourteen days post DA treatment and once three monthly were analysed by molecular techniques for T.parva.; In total, 8,975 samples from 3,084 animals were analysed. Prevalence of T.parva varied between 1-3% in different treatment regimens. RAP regimens were associated with slightly lower average risk of infection compared to DA. However, the confidence interval was broad and the result was not statistically significant. There was no evidence of a dose response relationship between graded RAP and T.parva prevalence. These findings are discussed herein with regard to endemic stability development to different TBDs.; We found only a slight effect of RAP on T.parva infection. Since sample size determination was based on trypanosomes incidence, the study was underpowered given the low T.parva prevalence. While the findings need to be confirmed in future studies, the observed slight reduction in the risk of infection with T.parva might not compromise endemic stability.
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Human and Animal Health > One Health (Zinsstag)
UniBasel Contributors:Hattendorf, Jan
Item Type:Article, refereed
Article Subtype:Research Article
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1756-3305
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Language:English
Identification Number:
Last Modified:16 Nov 2016 07:35
Deposited On:07 Nov 2014 08:28

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