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Carotid artery intima-media thickness in college students : race/ethnicity matters

Breton, Carrie V. and Wang, Xinhui and Mack, Wendy J. and Berhane, Kiros and Lopez, Milena and Islam, Talat S. and Feng, Mei and Hodis, Howard N. and Künzli, Nino and Avol, Ed. (2011) Carotid artery intima-media thickness in college students : race/ethnicity matters. Atherosclerosis, Vol. 217, H. 2. S. 441-446.

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Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6002132

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Racial/ethnic differences in common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) and in risk factors associated with CIMT have been predominantly observed in middle-aged and older individuals. We aimed to characterize racial/ethnic differences CIMT and other cardiovascular risk factors in a healthy, young-adult population. METHODS: College students were recruited as part of a study to characterize determinants of atherogenesis. Students were eligible if they were lifetime non-smokers, lived in the United States since six months of age, and attended high school in the United States. Blood pressure, heart rate, height, and weight were measured, B-mode carotid ultrasound was performed, questionnaires were administered and a 12-h fasting blood sample was collected. Associations between CIMT and other variables were assessed in 768 students aged 18-25 years using linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In models adjusted for common cardiovascular risk factors, sex exhibited the strongest influence on CIMT, with men having 15.4mum larger CIMT compared to women (95%CI 6.6, 24.2). Race/ethnicity was also strongly associated with CIMT. African Americans had 17.3mum greater CIMT (95%CI -0.3, 34.8) compared to non Hispanic Whites, whereas Asians and Hispanic Whites had 14.3 (95%CI -24.3, -4.4) and 15.4 (95%CI -26.2, -4.7) mum smaller CIMT, respectively. BMI and systolic blood pressure were positively associated with CIMT. CONCLUSION: The risk factors associated with atherogenesis later in life are already present and observable in college-aged young adults, so targeted campaigns to reduce life-long cardiovascular disease burden should be initiated earlier in life to improve public health
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Chronic Disease Epidemiology > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
03 Faculty of Medicine > Departement Public Health > Sozial- und Präventivmedizin > Air Pollution and Health (Künzli)
UniBasel Contributors:Künzli, Nino
Item Type:Article, refereed
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0021-9150
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
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Last Modified:06 Dec 2013 09:36
Deposited On:06 Dec 2013 09:36

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