edoc

Parasitic worms : knowledge, attitudes, and practices in Western Côte d'Ivoire with implications for integrated control

Acka, C. A. and Raso, G. and N'Goran E. K., and Tschannen, A. B. and Bogoch, I. I. and Seraphin, E. and Tanner, M. and Obrist, B. and Utzinger, J.. (2010) Parasitic worms : knowledge, attitudes, and practices in Western Côte d'Ivoire with implications for integrated control. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, Vol. 4, H. 12 , e910.

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5842973

Downloads: Statistics Overview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the developing world where parasitic worm infections are pervasive, preventive chemotherapy is the key strategy for morbidity control. However, local knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of parasitic worms are poorly understood, although such information is required for prevention and sustainable control. METHODS: We carried out KAP surveys in two rural communities of Cote d'Ivoire that were subjected to school-based and community-based research and control activities. We used qualitative and quantitative methods. The former included observations, in-depth interviews with key informants, and focus group discussions with school children and adults. Quantitative methods consisted of a structured questionnaire administered to household heads. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Access to clean water was lacking in both communities and only a quarter of the households had functioning latrines. There was a better understanding of soil-transmitted helminthiasis than intestinal schistosomiasis, but community-based rather than school-based interventions appeared to improve knowledge of schistosomiasis. In the villages with community-based interventions, three-quarters of household interviewees knew about intestinal schistosomiasis compared to 14% in the village where school-based interventions were implemented (P>0.001). Whereas two-thirds of respondents from the community-based intervention village indicated that the research and control project was the main source of information, only a quarter of the respondents cited the project as the main source. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Preventive chemotherapy targeting school-aged children has limitations, as older population segments are neglected, and hence lack knowledge about how to prevent and control parasitic worm infections. Improved access to clean water and sanitation is necessary, along with health education to make a durable impact against helminth infections
Faculties and Departments:09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Eco System Health Sciences > Health Impact Assessment (Utzinger)
09 Associated Institutions > Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) > Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) > Society, Gender and Health > Cultural Epidemiology (Weiss)
UniBasel Contributors:Obrist van Eeuwijk, Brigit and Tanner, Marcel and Utzinger, Jürg and Raso, Giovanna
Item Type:Article, refereed
Bibsysno:Link to catalogue
Publisher:Library of Science
ISSN:1935-2727
Note:Publication type according to Uni Basel Research Database: Journal article
Related URLs:
Identification Number:
Last Modified:21 Jun 2013 12:24
Deposited On:14 Sep 2012 06:48

Repository Staff Only: item control page